Friends of Lister Lane Cemetery

                                                                                                                                                                                 

Registered Charity No 1097153

Gunner (Signaller) Charles Parker Aske

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Charles was interred in grave number 91 

 

Memorial Inscription

 

In Loving memory of William Aske, of Elm Place, Halifax, who died Oct 7th 1896, aged 53 years.

His end was peace.

Also of Lily, wife of the above who died Aug. 27th 1899, aged 50 years.

Also of Ernest Parker Aske, son of the above, who died March 10th 1885, aged 15 years.

Also of Charles Aske, youngest son of the above and beloved husband of Rene Aske, who died in his country's service March 5th 1919, aged 35 years.

Also Edith Aske, died July 14th 1932, aged 58 years

Charles Parker Aske was born in March 1884, and baptised at St Thomas’s Church, Claremount, on the 9th April, the youngest son of William Aske, jeweller (1843-96), of Hampden Place, Halifax, by his wife nee Lily Parker (1848-99). Known as Charlie, he was educated locally, and after his parents’ deaths, he lived with his eldest brother William at Beechwood Road, Illingworth, training as a draper’s apprentice. In due course he became a commercial traveller.  

 

In November 1907, Charles married Irene Bertha Holstead at Halifax Register Office; she was known as Rene. Initially they lived at Sandbeds, Pellon, where their eldest child, Brian Hope, was born in 1910. After they moved to Brookville Avenue, Hipperholme, two daughters were born, Dorothy Margaret in 1913 and Marjorie in 1916.

 

In December 1915 he enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery as a Gunner (Signaller). We know from his enlistment papers that he was just over 5ft 7in tall. He served in France for over two years as a signaller/telephonist. In March 1918 he was admitted to hospital, but returned to duties. In August he was allowed home on leave.

 

Early in 1919 Charles’ health further deteriorated, and he spent some time in Shelf Sanatorium. He died of broncho-pneumonia on the 5th March, at 36 Emscote Street, the home of his brother-in-law Stanley Rimmel, who had served in the Army Ordinance Corps. Charles was buried a few days later in the family grave at Lister Lane Cemetery. The death was registered as “directly due to military service,” indicating that Charles had contracted serious health problems while in France. Rimmel immediately contacted the authorities on behalf of the widowed Rene. A correspondence ensued with the Regimental Depot, and a pension was granted to Rene, from the September following. In 1922 she also received her husband’s War and Victory medals. Rene survived her husband for 46 years, dying in Somerset in 1965, aged 76.  Charles and Rene’s only son, Brian, died in 2003, aged 93.

 

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Source of biographical information for Gunner (Signaller) Charles Parker Aske:

 

Lister Lane Cemetery: History, Residents, Legacy - Published by The Friends of Lister Lane Cemetery, 2013

Image taken from the Halifax Courier, dated March 8th, 1919

Charles Parker Aske was born in March 1884, and baptised at St Thomas’s Church, Claremount, on the 9th April, the youngest son of William Aske, jeweller (1843-96), of Hampden Place, Halifax, by his wife nee Lily Parker (1848-99). Known as Charlie, he was educated locally, and after his parents’ deaths, he lived with his eldest brother William at Beechwood Road, Illingworth, training as a draper’s apprentice. In due course he became a commercial traveller.  

 

In November 1907, Charles married Irene Bertha Holstead at Halifax Register Office; she was known as Rene. Initially they lived at Sandbeds, Pellon, where their eldest child, Brian Hope, was born in 1910. After they moved to Brookville Avenue, Hipperholme, two daughters were born, Dorothy Margaret in 1913 and Marjorie in 1916.

 

In December 1915 he enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery as a Gunner (Signaller). We know from his enlistment papers that he was just over 5ft 7in tall. He served in France for over two years as a signaller/telephonist. In March 1918 he was admitted to hospital, but returned to duties. In August he was allowed home on leave.  

 

Early in 1919 Charles’ health further deteriorated, and he spent some time in Shelf Sanatorium. He died of broncho-pneumonia on the 5th March, at 36 Emscote Street, the home of his brother-in-law Stanley Rimmel, who had served in the Army Ordinance Corps. Charles was buried a few days later in the family grave at Lister Lane Cemetery. The death was registered as “directly due to military service,” indicating that Charles had contracted serious health problems while in France. Rimmel immediately contacted the authorities on behalf of the widowed Rene. A correspondence ensued with the Regimental Depot, and a pension was granted to Rene, from the September following. In 1922 she also received her husband’s War and Victory medals. Rene survived her husband for 46 years, dying in Somerset in 1965, aged 76.  Charles and Rene’s only son, Brian, died in 2003, aged 93.